The Open AIDS Journal




ISSN: 1874-6136 ― Volume 13, 2019
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Immunologic Restoration of People Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy in Ethiopia: The Focus of Chronic Non-Communicable Disease Co-Morbidities



Tsegaye Melaku*, Girma Mamo, Legese Chelkeba, Tesfahun Chanie
School of Pharmacy, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Oromia 378, Ethiopia

Abstract

Background:

The life expectancy of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has dramatically improved with the much-increased access to antiretroviral therapy. Consequently, a larger number of people living with HIV are living longer and facing the increased burden of non-communicable diseases. This study assessed the effect of chronic non-communicable disease(s) and co-morbidities on the immunologic restoration of HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Methods:

A nested case-control study was conducted among people living with HIV at Jimma University Medical Center from February 20 to August 20, 2016. Cases were HIV infected patients living with chronic non-communicable diseases and controls were people living with HIV only. Patient-specific data were collected using a structured data collection tool to identify relevant information. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science version 20.0. Logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with outcome. Statistical significance was considered at p-value <0.05. A patient's written informed consent was obtained after explaining the purpose of the study.

Results:

A total of 240 participants (120 cases and 120 controls) were included in the analysis. Prevalence of hypertension was 12.50%, and diabetes was 10.84%. About 10.42% of study participants were living with multi-morbidity. At baseline, the mean (±SD) age of cases was 42.32±10.69 years, whereas it was 38.41±8.23 years among controls. The median baseline CD4+ cell count was 184.50 cells/µL (IQR: 98.50 - 284.00 cells/µL) for cases and 177.0 cells/µL (IQR: 103.75 - 257.25 cells/µL) for controls. Post-6-months of highly active antiretroviral therapy initiation, about 29.17% of cases and 16.67% of controls had poor immunologic restoration. An average increase of CD4+ cell count was 6.4cells/µL per month among cases and 7.6 cells/µL per month among controls. Male sex [AOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.496 to 8.24; p=0.004], smoking history [AOR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.072, to 7.342; p=0.036] and co-morbidity with chronic non-communicable disease(s) [AOR, 3.99; 95% CI, 1.604 to 9.916; p=0.003)] were independent predictors of poor immunologic restoration.

Conclusions:

Chronic non-communicable disease(s) have negative effects on the kinetics of CD4+ cell count among HIV-infected patients who initiated antiretroviral therapy. So the integration of chronic non-communicable disease-HIV collaborative activities will strengthen battle to control the double burden of chronic illnesses.

Keywords: Non-communicable disease, Co-morbidity, Human immunodeficiency virus, Treatment outcome, Immunologic restoration, Anti-retroviral therapy.


Article Information


Identifiers and Pagination:

Year: 2019
Volume: 13
First Page: 36
Last Page: 48
Publisher Id: TOAIDJ-13-36
DOI: 10.2174/1874613601913010036

Article History:

Received Date: 03/03/2019
Revision Received Date: 11/04/2019
Acceptance Date: 25/04/2019
Electronic publication date: 31/05/2019
Collection year: 2019

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© 2019 Melaku et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


* Address correspondence to this author at the School of Pharmacy, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Oromia 378, Ethiopia; Tel: +251913765609;
E-mail: tsegayemlk@yahoo.com or tsegaye.melaku@ju.edu.et




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